I'm Not Chinese: The Journey From
Resentment to Reverence

raywong_imnotchinese.jpg

"The first thing you need to know is I’m not Chinese. My name is Raymond Wong and I stopped being Chinese at the age of five."

Raymond Wong wants to forget his past: a charming, conniving, and controlling Chinese mother, a father who hasn’t so much as written him a letter in twenty-eight years, a stepfather who never sees him as a son, a childhood rife with ridicule and bullying from American kids, and the pain of being an outcast in his own family. Raymond goes back to Hong Kong with the mother he has always pushed away, a woman who represents everything he wants to disown. He meets a father he doesn’t recognize and can’t talk to because they speak different languages. He encounters a people and a country as foreign as the Cantonese he can no longer comprehend. 

I’m Not Chinese: The Journey from Resentment to Reverence is about a man who has spent his life running from his culture, his family, himself—and what happens when he is forced to stop running.

 

  The E-book is available at the following sites.

 

The paperback is available at the Ibookstore.

 

Buy a printed version from the publisher.

 

The paperback is available in San Diego at Comickaze in Clairemont.



Reviews

 

"This book made me assess my own relationship with my parents, wondering what important history I have missed because of my own closed eyes."

Katherine Pickett

Owner of Pop Editorial Services and author of Perfect Bound: How to Navigate the Book Publishing Process Like a Pro

 

"I’m Not Chinese is a deeply personal portrait full of heart, humor, and compassion."

Steve Brannon

Editor, Small Print Magazine

 

"(The Book) dovetails with many of the best memoirs I've read that show us the transnational contours of Asian American identity."

Stephen Sohn

Book Reviewer, Asian American Literature Fans  

        

Awards, Media, Conferences, and publications:

Buying the Wrong Car -- Article in The Penny Hoarder. Aug 1, 2017

BOOK REVIEW -- by Charse Yun For Blue Lyra Review. Nov 1, 2016

We Need Training To Survive Active Shooter Emergencies  IN San Diego Union-Tribune. Dec 11, 2015

A series of letters to my deceased father is included in a nonfiction anthology, Songs of Ourselves: America's Internal Landscape, from Blue Heron Book Works. December 1, 2015. Available at indiebound

BOOK REVIEW  by Maggie Trapp from UC Berkeley in Gloom Cupboard. JULY 28, 2015 

Small print magazine book review of "Lifespan of a Fact"   JUly 18, 2015    

2015 San Diego Book Awards Co-winner in "memoir." June 20, 2015 U-t list of winners 

Author Describes Journey from Rejecting to Embracing Heritage in I'm Not Chinese by Kristina Houck in the Del Mar Times. June 9, 2015  

San Diego Living Interview by Marc Bailey. Feb 2, 2015  

DIVIDED A MEMOIR EXCERPT IN MARATHON LITERARY REVIEW, THE JOURNAL FOR ARCADIA UNIVERSITY'S MFA IN CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM. JAN 28, 2015

SDSU Writers' Conference InterviewJanuary 23-25, 2015  

THE GOLDEN AGE OF PUBLISHING  KPBS RADIO INTERVIEW WITH LITERARY AGENT, CHIP MACGREGOR. JAN 22, 2015   

Hate  (Page 24) A Memoir Excerpt in Segue, the Literary Journal of Miami University. Dec 18, 2014

A REVIEW OF RAYMOND M. WONG'S I'M NOT CHINESE BY STEPHEN SOHN, ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE FANS. NOV 1, 2014

PROLOGUE AUDIO RECORDING BY T.G. LAFREDO. OCT 29, 2014 

AUTHOR EMBRACES LOST CULTURE INTERVIEW BY JOHN WILKENS, SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE. OCT 4, 2014  

I'm Not Chinese  interview by Linda Loegel, Author/Blogger. Sept 21, 2014

Foreign A Memoir Excerpt in Small Print MagazineRaymond Wong Memoir Released. July 14, 2014

   

 


Discussion Questions

1. What resentments are evident in this narrator from the prologue? 

2. In this memoir the narrator embarks on a trip to Hong Kong and mainland China. What inner journey does he take on? 

3. At the book’s beginning, the narrator is ambivalent about Quyen, the woman he is dating. What shifts his views about relationships and marriage?

4. Take a look at the chapter, “Hate." What is the implication about human nature?  

5. Go to the chapter, "Reverence." What is the narrator’s epiphany?

 

6. A motif or repeating theme weaves through this memoir. It relates to how the mother sees Hong Kong and mainland China. What is this motif?

7. In the chapter, "Wounds," why is the narrator upset?  

8. The narrator’s mom married to stay in America. How do you view her actions in the context of this book?

9. What does this story suggest about the plight of African Americans who to some extent still live in two worlds, one white and one black?

10. If we are a country of immigrants, what does it mean to be an American?